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Understanding Infertility

Infertility as defined by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM.org) :

Infertility is the result of a disease (an interruption, cessation, or disorder of body functions, systems, or organs) of the male or female reproductive tract which prevents the conception of a child or the ability to carry a pregnancy to delivery. The duration of unprotected intercourse with failure to conceive should be about 12 months before an infertility evaluation is undertaken, unless medical history, age, or physical findings dictate earlier evaluation and treatment.

Quick Facts About Infertility (from ASRM.org)

  • Infertility is NOT an inconvenience; it is a disease of the reproductive system that impairs the body’s ability to perform the basic function of reproduction.
  • Impaired fecundity (the inability have a child) affects 6.7 million women in the U.S. — about 11% of the reproductive-age population (Source: National Survey of Family Growth, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] 2006-2010).
  • In a survey of married women, the CDC found that 1.5 million women in the US (6%) are infertile (Source: National Survey of Family Growth, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] 2006-2010).
  • Infertility affects men and women equally.
  • Twenty-five percent of infertile couples have more than one factor that contributes to their infertility.
  • In approximately 40 percent of infertile couples, the male partner is either the sole cause or a contributing cause of infertility.
  • Irregular or abnormal ovulation accounts for approximately 25 percent of all female infertility problems.
  • Most infertility cases — 85% to 90% — are treated with conventional medical therapies such as medication or surgery.
  • While vital for some patients, in vitro fertilization and similar treatments account for less than 3% of infertility services, and about (or approximately) seven hundredths of one percent (0.07%) of U.S. health care costs.
  • Twelve percent of all infertility cases are a result of the woman either weighing too little or too much
  • It is possible for women with body weight disorders to reverse their infertility by attaining and maintaining a healthy weight.
  • Men and Women who smoke have decreased fertility.
  • The risk of miscarriage is higher for pregnant women who smoke.
  • Up to 13 percent of female infertility is caused by cigarette smoking.
  • Chlamydia causes about 4 to 5 million infections annually in the United States. If left untreated, chlamydia can cause infertility.

**NCCRM was the first private infertility treatment center in NC. NCCRM was established in 1992 to provide advanced reproductive techniques to couples who dream of having their own child.  Based on the premise, all people should be allowed access to treatment for infertility at an affordable price.  One of our founders, Dr. Luther Talbert, is credited with performing the first successful IVF cycle in North Carolina. We have one of the highest pregnancy success rates in the country, along with affordable tubal reversal and IVF packages.**