Patient Resources

Types of Pelvic Floor Repair

Pelvic floor repair is the most common surgery for prolapse. Anterior repair refers to the correction of the front wall of the vagina, while posterior repair refers to the correction of the back wall of the vagina. If the uterus is prolapsing, it may be removed through hysterectomy. If you have already received a hysterectomy, the top of the vagina can be lifted and supported. 

Anterior Vaginal Repair

Anterior repair is a surgical procedure done to repair or reinforce the layers between the bladder and the vagina that have been weakened. The goal is to relieve symptoms of vaginal bulging/laxity and improve bladder function without interfering with sexual function. There is a chance that prolapse may recur or another part of the vaginal wall may prolapse, but success rates for anterior repair are 70-90%. A common method of performing this surgery is by an incision made along the center of the front wall of the vagina, beginning near the entrance and ending near the top of the vagina. The weakened layers are repaired with absorbable stitches and some excess vaginal skin may be removed. 

Posterior Vaginal Repair

A prolapse of the back wall of the vagina is usually attributed to weakness in the strong tissue layers that divide the vagina from the lower part of the bowel. Posterior repair is a surgical procedure performed to repair or reinforce the weakened layers between the rectum and the vagina. The goal of the surgery is to relieve symptoms of vaginal bulging/laxity and improve bowel function without interfering with sexual function. Success rates are 80-90%, but there is a chance that prolapse may recur or another part of the vaginal wall may prolapse. 

Vaginal Hysterectomy

If you have a uterine prolapse, a vaginal hysterectomy may be necessary. A uterine prolapse occurs when the uterus drops down into the vagina. In more serious cases, it can extend beyond the entrance to the vagina. Vaginal hysterectomy removes the uterus through the vagina. Success rates are 85%. Some women may develop further prolapse of the vaginal vault months, perhaps years, later. 

Seek medical advice if you develop a strong-smelling vaginal discharge, excessive bleeding, increasing abdominal pains, burning or stinging while passing urine, painful swollen legs, shortness of breath or chest pain, vomiting, or fever. 

NCCRM

The North Carolina Center for Reproductive Medicine/Talbert Fertility Institute is the premiere center for reproductive health in North Carolina and the East Coast. Our team specializes in fertility testing, diagnosis, and treatment of infertility conditions. We’re experts in IVF, Tubal Ligation Reversal, Male Infertility, Intrauterine Insemination (IUI), Gestation Surrogacy, Family Balancing, and more. Contact us today.


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